The Archaetnos Passion

Giving back to archaeology

 

Steinaecker’s Horse research project (1997 – Ongoing)

Introduction

The Steinaecker’s Horse research project has been running since 1997.  It started during 1996 when the Northernmost or Letaba outpost of Steinaecker’s Horse was rediscovered by an expedition under the leadership of the Director of the future Archaetnos.  This resulted in writing a research proposal to SanParks to excavate the site, which was subsequently approved.

During September 1997 the site was excavated for the first time by a team led by Anton van Vollenhoven.  He was then employed by the National Cultural History Museum.  The museum however withdrew financial support during 1998.  By this time Archaetnos has been established and it was decided to proceed with the project out of own funds.

The Steinaecker’s Horse project is managed under the research leg of Archaetnos and is the company’s way of giving back to archaeology.  The project is funded by Archaetnos.  It also is a means to still be able to do research.

Through the project many volunteers and students in archaeology had the chance to get first-hand experience of excavations and all it entails.  By giving lectures in the different camps where the excavators stayed throughout the project, public awareness about archaeology and the importance of our cultural heritage is enhanced.  The project is also used by Archaetnos as a public relations venture.  Every year the media is informed and kept so about the day to day developments on site.

The importance of this project lies within the fact that very little research has been done about the Anglo-Boer-War, from an archaeological perspective.  Furthermore it creates the opportunity to do research on the involvement of the indigenous people during the war, an area that did not receive much attention during the past years from researchers.

Short history of Steinaecker’s Horse

(A full account of the history of the unit and the various excavations can be found in the different excavation reports under the section ‘Reports’ on this website)

Steinaecker’s Horse was a volunteer military unit that fought on the side of the British during the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902). It operated mainly in the Lowveld of South Africa and Swaziland. The unit was formed by an interesting man named Francis Christiaan Ludwig von Steinaecker, a former Prussian-German soldier with extensive military experience. He came to SA in 1886, working as cartographer in German South-West Africa, before settling in Natal in 1890. He became a British subject and when the war broke out in 1899, he joined the Colonial Scouts.

Colonel Ludwig von Steinaecher

Colonel Ludwig von Steinaecher in the uniform he designed himself

He came to the attention of General Buller, commander of the British Forces during the early stages of the war, and after participating in a series of successful campaigns against the Boers, he was given permission to raise his own cavalry unit, called Steinaecker’s Horse. He was also promoted to the rank of Major. The unit (close to 600 men) consisted mainly of local inhabitants of the Lowveld region, while local Black groups such as Shangane and Swazi, also assisted (or rather, were utilized by the unit) in their activities.

Members of SH at Komatipoort

Members of SH at Komatipoort

Although they did not encounter much military action, they were involved in a few skirmishes with the Boers (notably the Battle of Fort Mpisane on 7 August 1901). The units’ main function was to act as border guard in order to prevent the Boers from making contact with their supporters in Portuguese-East Africa (Mozambique). For this purpose a number of outposts were established along the 200km stretch of the Lebombo Mountains, specifically in the area today known as the Kruger National Park.

The unit had some successes during the war and two members received the Distinguished Service Order (DSO).  However, they were also notorious for their bad behaviour, raiding of property and unethical conduct.

Steinaecker’s Horse was eventually disbanded during 1903.  Their most important legacy is the contribution some of their members made to the later Kruger National Park.  The Adjutant of the unit, Major AA Greenhill-Gardyne, wrote a protocol for the preservation of the wild life in the area.  This document was used by Major J Stevenson-Hamilton as he started working as the first warden of the Park.  Some of the members of Steinaecker’s Horse became game rangers, among them the well-known Harry Wolhuter.

The Steinaecker’s Horse project so far

Archaeological excavations were done on the Letaba site during 1997, 2000 and 2002.  A display of the findings of the first two years was mounted at the Mopani Rest Camp during 2003.  It was moved to the Makhadzi picnic site shortly afterwards as this is the closest accessible point for tourists to the actual site.

In 1998 the archives of the Kruger Park at Skukuza was visited in order to obtain more historical information on Steinaecker’s Horse.  Archival research now is a continuous process, including the South African and British National Archives as well as those of private collectors.

During 2003 other sites associated with the unit was searched for during extensive foot surveys in the Park.  Fourteen sites were identified in or close to the Park through literature and archival research.  Ten of these have physically been located and the search for the other four continues.

The Komatipoort site was the headquarters of Steinaecker’s Horse.  This site was documented during 2004.  It consists of many remains of buildings and other infrastructure built and utilised by Steinaecker’s Horse.

Map indicating the sites of SH in or close to the Kruger National Park

Map indicating the sites of SH in or close
to the Kruger National Park

  1. KaNwamuriwane
  2. Fort Mpisane
  3. Salitje
  4. Terrain where Bill Sanderson received his internship
  5. Gaz a Gray outpost
  6. Outspan
  7. Sardelli’s shop
  8. Bottelkop
  9. Muntshe
  10. Ngotsomond
  11. Sabie bridge
  12. Northern outpost
  13. Komatipoort headquarters
  14. Kilo 104

Steinaecker’s Horse sites in or close to the Kruger National Park

The Sabi Bridge (Skukuza) site was excavated during 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2009.  This site is quite complex as it did not only host Steinaecker’s Horse, but also the Selati railway line and recent military activities.  The Selati/Oosterspoorlyn cut through a part of the area today known as the Kruger National Park.  The line stopped short of the Sabi River near Skukuza (where the Bridge is today) during August 1894.

Up to and during the Anglo-Boer War no work was done on the line, although it played an important role (the Boers used the line to store and organize their rolling stock until the British took control of it).

Between 1901 and 1902 Steinaecker’s Horse used the uncompleted section near “Skukuza”/Sabi Bridge (the southern end of the line).

They built a blockhouse here, a fairly basic construction of brick and corrugated iron.  After the war, and when Steinaecker’s left the scene (on 24 November 1902) Stevenson-Hamilton, the first Game Warden of the Park (between 1902 and 1946) moved into the blockhouse, using it as his Headquarters.

Excavation of the mess hall at Sabi Bridge in progress

Excavation of the mess hall at Sabi Bridge in progress

Remains of a spade found at the blacksmith area at Sabi Bridge

Remains of a spade found at the
blacksmith area at Sabi Bridge

Excavation of the blacksmith area at Sabi Bridge

Excavation of the blacksmith area at Sabi Bridge

Collapsed clay ceiling of the mess hall at Sabi Bridge

Collapsed clay ceiling of the mess hall at Sabi Bridge

The Ngotso Mouth site was excavated in 2008 and 2013.  This site is at the confluence between the Ngotso and Olifants River, close to the Balule rest camp.  Very little evidence regarding this site is found in historical sources.

The famous game ranger and member of Steinaecker’s Horse, Harry Wolhuter, mentions that he camped alongside a river on his way to some of the outposts of Steinaecker’s Horse in the north.  He named the river Ngotso after one of the indigenous people who guided them to the Olifants River.  Pienaar also makes mention of an outpost close to the Olifants River.

The Gaza Gray outpost of Steinaecker’s Horse was investigated between 2010 and 2012. The site is named after Edward George Gray who was a captain in the Steinaecker’s Horse unit.  He was nicknamed Gaza as he used to work in Portuguese East Africa before the War.

He was in command of three outposts of Steinaecker’s Horse namely this one, the nearby one at Gomondwane and the one at Crocodile Bridge.  After the War he became a game ranger in the Sabi game reserve (later Kruger Park).

Apart from being a very large site it used to host the cattle of Gray and some local people before the War. During the War it was used by Steinaecker’s Horse to keep the cattle that they confiscated from local people and some of the Boer farmers such as Abel Erasmus.  As a result the site has many refuse middens in which cultural material is mixed with remains of cattle kraals.  During the 2010 excavation the human remains of five individuals were unearthed here. Another one was unearthed during 2011.

Remains of a woman excavated at the Gaza Gray outpost

Remains of a woman excavated
at the Gaza Gray outpost

Remains of a man excavated at the Gaza Gray outpost

Remains of a man excavated at the Gaza Gray outpost

Future planning

SanParks have approved a three year plan for research on the Gaza Gray sites.  These will be dealt with between 2014 and 2016.

Excavation of the mess building at Sabi Bridge

Excavation of the mess building at Sabi Bridge

The results of these excavations as well as the sites that have not yet been excavated will determine a next research project plan.  If approved, this will run from 2014 and will most likely focus on the Gaza Gray site, Gomondwane and the one where Bill Sanderson was interned.

Dutch gin bottles excavated at Sabi Bridge

Dutch gin bottles excavated
at Sabi Bridge

Uniform buttons from the Sabi Bridge site

Uniform buttons from the Sabi Bridge site

Martini Henry-cartridge from the Sabi Bridge site

Martini Henry-cartridge from the Sabi Bridge site

 

Front side of the same sixpences

Front side of the same sixpences

Back side of two sixpence’s excavated at the mess hall at Sabi Bridge

Back side of two sixpence’s excavated at the mess hall at Sabi Bridge

Lead seals from different alcoholic glass bottles from the Sabi Bridge post

Lead seals from different alcoholic glass bottles from the Sabi Bridge post

 Social enjoyment

As the people who participate in the project are volunteers, Archaetnos also wants them to get more out the project than only the scientific side.  Work starts at 6:00 am and ends early afternoon so that they may enjoy some game viewing.  The weekend in-between (the excursion usually runs for two weeks) is also used for game viewing.

The team excavating at the Ngotso Mouth camp of Steinaecker’s Horse

The team excavating at the Ngotso Mouth camp of Steinaecker’s Horse

The team of excavators at Ngotso Mouth

The team of excavators at Ngotso Mouth

In the evenings everyone gathers around the camp fire where food is prepared and everyone gets the chance to discuss the day’s finds or just relax.  Special accolades are given to those who unearthed something special or perhaps just made a fool of him/herself.  A specific award, The Golden Potshard, is given to a worthy recipient.  At the end of the excursion one of the excavators receive the highest honour, being The Golden Potsherd for the camp.

 

People interested in joining the 2013 research team can contact Dr Anton van Vollenhoven at antonv@archaetnos.co.za

Nightfall at Balule

Nightfall at Balule

Campfire at Balule

Campfire at Balule